Tag Archive: Ebola virus


ebola10Okay, we all know that the CDC doesn’t have a handle on Ebola. No one is properly trained, improper equipment to handle Ebola cases, the system doesn’t communicate and the CDC is behind the curve ball playing catch up to the point that the World Health Organization issued a report yesterday about Ebola. The full report can be found here.

In short summary this is what WHO has to say:

That evidence shows that the incubation period can be as long as 42 days. Not the 21 days that the CDC has stated repeatedly.

95% of confirmed cases have an incubation period in the range of 1 to 21 days; 98% have an incubation period that falls within the 1 to 42 day interval.

WHO is alarmed by media reports of suspected Ebola cases imported into new countries that are said, by government officials or ministries of health, to be discarded as “negative” within hours after the suspected case enters the country.
Such rapid determination of infection status is impossible, casting grave doubts on some of the official information that is being communicated to the public and the media.
• For early detection of Ebola virus in suspected or probable cases, detection of viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) or viral antigen are the recommended tests.
• Laboratory-confirmed cases must test positive for the presence of the Ebola virus, either by detection of viral RNA by RT-PCR, and/or by detection of Ebola antigen by a specific Antigen detection test, and/or by detection of immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies directed against Ebola.
• Two negative RT-PCR test results, at least 48 hours apart, are required for a clinically asymptomatic patient to be discharged from hospital, or for a suspected Ebola case to be discarded as testing negative for the virus. (this is my statement, asymptomatic means NO SYMPTOMS!!)
• Laboratory results should be communicated to WHO as quickly as possible, in addition to reporting under the requirements and within the timelines set out in the International Health Regulations, which are administered by WHO.

Note

WHO recommends that the first 25 positive cases and 50 negative specimens detected by a country without a recognized national reference viral haemorrhagic fever laboratory should be sent for secondary confirmatory testing to a WHO collaborating centre, designed as specialized in the safe detection (at biosafety level IV) of viral haemorrhagic fevers.
Similarly, for countries with a national reference laboratory for viral haemorrhagic fevers, the initial positive cases should also be sent to a WHO collaborating centre for confirmation.
If results are concordant, laboratory results reported from the national reference laboratory would be accepted by WHO.

The CDC is NOT doing this. Hospitals are not up to speed on this either.

AND according the CDC’s own website:
When Specimens Should Be Collected for Ebola Testing at CDC:

Ebola virus is detected in blood only after the onset of symptoms, usually fever. It may take up to 3 days after symptoms appear for the virus to reach detectable levels. Virus is generally detectable by real-time RT-PCR from 3-10 days after symptoms appear.
Specimens ideally should be taken when a symptomatic patient reports to a healthcare facility and is suspected of having an Ebola exposure. However, if the onset of symptoms is ❤ days, a later specimen may be needed to completely rule-out Ebola virus, if the first specimen tests negative.

So…in plain English, if someone has only a fever then they can’t be cleared for AT LEAST 3 days if not up to 10 days since the early testing can take up to 10 days for the Ebola virus to show up in the recommended RNA/RT-PCR test.

So let’s see…we have had several people test back ‘negative’ and released shortly there after before conclusive testing is has back from the CDC and I am sure the CDC is sending onto WHO for verification of the negative as they have requested. Where is the harm in waiting the full 10 days IF someone has knowingly been exposed to Ebola (such as the Deputy in Frisco) or the healthcare workers and their contacts? OR if someone who has within the past 8 weeks has been in a country where Ebola is pandemic? What is wrong with our government? On the outside 42 days enforced quarantine should be warranted for those who were directly exposed to Ebola. And by ENFORCED I mean legally quarantined in their homes with restricted movement…

We now have a case of 2nd nurse who traveled from Cleveland to Dallas knowing she had been directly exposed to Ebola and the day after the flight reported to the hospital with a low fever and in fact has tested positive for Ebola. 132 people on the plane now have to be watched. And what about those she had contact with in Cleveland?

Applause go out to the hospital in Richmond, VA (VCU Medical) for keeping the woman in isolation who has so far tested negative for Ebola but has recently traveled from Liberia and has a fever (all that the public is being told). Guess they are paying attention and understand the potential ramifications.

I truly believe that our government and healthcare system needs to get WHO here in this country. These people KNOW their stuff and how to stop it. It is becoming increasing obvious that the CDC and our healthcare system doesn’t. Let’s get the people here who KNOW how to deal with Ebola and lets get real America, this could get serious fast if we don’t clamp down NOW.

While I am deeply sympathetic to the nurses and doctors who risked their lives in helping Duncan, totally ill prepared, uniformed and ill equipped, we are facing a pandemic if we don’t quarantine people for the full 42 days. This is the ONLY way to stop Ebola in its tracks. And we need to do it NOW before it gets out of hand.

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ebola deputyAs we continue to monitor the growing concerns of Ebola here in the US, a second potential case is now under observation in the very hospital that Mr.Duncan, the Liberian national who knowing came to US carrying Ebola died in. This second potential case occurred on the same day that patient zero died.

As of 3pm today the patient taken from a Frisco care clinic to Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Oct. 8 exhibiting possible Ebola symptoms has tested negative for Ebola, according to the Texas Department of Health and Human Services.

Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas said in a statement Thursday that Micahel Monning remains in good condition one day after he was taken by ambulance to the hospital.
The hospital says Monning does not have a fever, vomiting or diarrhea. Results of further testing are expected later Thursday.

Officials had said earlier that Monning was hospitalized out of an “abundance of caution” after falling ill Wednesday.

Monning went to an urgent care clinic in Fisco, a northern suburb of Dallas, and was exhibiting enough symptoms of Ebola to trigger a preliminary screening, Frisco fire Chief Mark Piland said. He did not specify the symptoms.

Although I personally watched the news conference wherein Chief Piland did state that Monning had 4 symptoms typical of early bola.

First symptoms are the sudden onset of fever fatigue, muscle pain, headache and sore throat. This is followed by vomiting, diarrhea, rash, symptoms of impaired kidney and liver function, and in some cases, both internal and external bleeding (e.g. oozing from the gums, blood in the stools). Laboratory findings include low white blood cell and platelet counts and elevated liver enzymes. (WHO)

I would personally questions what symptoms Monnig had that would trigger a preliminary screening and further testing especially given that just 5 days ago, a man and his daughter who were from Liberia were held on a plane coming into Newark International after the man was vomiting and showing signs of ebola. It only took health officials several hours to confirm that he did NOT have Ebola.

And now, as of 3pm today, October 9th, Texas Health officials are saying Monnig who entered the apartment without any protective gear does not have Ebola. However, according to the city of Frisco communications office, CareNow administrators have decided to close tonight and remain closed until the morning of Oct. 10 while the facility undergoes deep cleaning.

The CDC still ascertains that the ONLY way to contract Ebola is with direct contact with infected bodily fluids. However, just a few days ago on October 6th the World Health Organization put out an update bulletin about Ebola transmission.

“The Ebola virus is transmitted among humans through close and direct physical contact with infected bodily fluids, the most infectious being blood, feces and vomit.
The Ebola virus has also been detected in breast milk, urine and semen. In a convalescent male, the virus can persist in semen for at least 70 days; one study suggests persistence for more than 90 days.
Saliva and tears may also carry some risk. However, the studies implicating these additional bodily fluids were extremely limited in sample size and the science is inconclusive. In studies of saliva, the virus was found most frequently in patients at a severe stage of illness. The whole live virus has never been isolated from sweat.

The Ebola virus can also be transmitted indirectly, by contact with previously contaminated surfaces and objects. The risk of transmission from these surfaces is low and can be reduced even further by appropriate cleaning and disinfection procedures.”

It is also stated in their bulletin that:

“Theoretically, wet and bigger droplets from a heavily infected individual, who has respiratory symptoms caused by other conditions or who vomits violently, could transmit the virus – over a short distance – to another nearby person.
This could happen when virus-laden heavy droplets are directly propelled, by coughing or sneezing (which does not mean airborne transmission) onto the mucus membranes or skin with cuts or abrasions of another person.”

So far, according to reports, none of the family member who had direct contact with Duncan have come down with symptoms of Ebola. But their time is not yet up.

What is most concerning to me is that officials from the CDC continue to deny what the WHO says about transmission of Ebola, and the CDC’s comments that we will see more cases of Ebola in this country.

Why does this need to happen? Also of concern at this time is that as more ‘suspected’ cases are found not to be Ebola is that we as Americans could be lulled into a false sense of ‘security’ that our government and health officials are ‘containing’ it. I would question if false positives are a potential threat. I would also question why decontamination is needed at schools and at the care clinic where Monnig was seen IF what officials are saying to us are true. Just my personal thoughts. Over abundance of caution or ‘preparation’? While I am not trying to strike fear into the heart of anyone, I am just asking questions that need answers before we see another case here in the US.

Stay safe, be prepared
Survivingshtfmom